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Skycar® 400

The Skycar® 400 is the 5th generation of VTOL aircraft developed by Dr. Paul Moller and is now in the “operational prototype” stage. The Skycar® combines the high-speed capabilities of a fixed wing aircraft with the vertical take-off and landing capabilities of a helicopter.

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For $100 You Can Get First Dibs on Larry Page’s Flying Car

April 25, 2017 – The flying car may soon be a reality — and consumers have an opportunity to get in on the action early. For $100, you can get priority placement on a wait list for the aircraft from Kitty Hawk, the flying car company financially backed by Google co-founder Larry Page.

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Uber partners with NASA on flying car management

November 10, 2017 – MotorAuthority – With the rise of a new way to transport human beings, potentially through self-operating flying cars, the industry will need new regulations to ensure.

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Uber teams with NASA to take to the skies with ‘flying cars’

November 10, 2017 – Uber doesn’t know when to stop, so now that the roads have been dominated the ridesharing giant is looking to the skies with its latest partnership.

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NASA ready to back Uber in plans to manage flying taxis

November 10, 2017 – NASA and Uber will be working together to ensure that the ride-sharing company’s plans to deploy a fleet of flying taxis by 2020 gets off the ground, through the advancements of NASA’s Urban Air Mobility (UAM) program.

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Hoversurf, the company behind the world’s first hoverbike, unveils plans for flying five-seater taxi

October 31, 2017 – Flying taxis are taking yet another step towards reality after Hoversurf, the maker of the world’s first hoverbike, unveiled its plans to enter the electric VTOL (vertical take-off and landing) transportation market.

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Flying Patents

October 10, 2017 – How the unidentified flying object inspired a flurry of flying saucer patents globally—and how one guy invented his flying saucer years before anyone else.

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SkyDrive, the Japanese Flying Car That Caught Toyota’s Fancy

May 20, 2017 – When the creative team of Cartivator conceived the SkyDrive flying car project in one of its brainstorming sessions over four years ago, they never imagined that a tech giant like Toyota would agree to become one its investors. Toyota assured them funding of 42.5 million yen (US$380,000) in the next three years to develop the SkyDrive to light the Olympic flame during the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games.

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New Competitor Developing Self-Flying Air Taxis Emerges

May 20, 2017 – Yet another animated video of a flying car set to be produced in Silicon Valley has surfaced, and rather than keep it under wraps, the company is laying it all out in plain sight. Vahana is an all-electric, eight-motor, single seat vertical takeoff aircraft set to be made by Airbus. With its pivoting rotors, the vehicle is designed to be used as an automated flying taxi.

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Flying Cars Are (Still) Coming: Should We Believe The Hype?

April 25, 1017 – In the 1950s, when America was hopeful and reckless conjecture was encouraged, prognosticators had some wild ideas about 21st century technology. A few came true, like robot companions. Most didn’t, like lunar shuttles. But one concept in particular has endured without quite being realized — the flying car. Check those special “future” editions of old magazines and you’ll find plenty of stalwart citizens commuting to work in hovering sedans, with tail fins. So where did the dream go wrong?

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No Longer a Dream: Silicon Valley Takes On the Flying Car

With Zee.Aero and Kitty Hawk, the Google co-founder looks to the skies.

April 24, 2017 – Kitty Hawk’s flying car, if you insisted on calling it a “car,” looked like something Luke Skywalker would have built out of spare parts. It was an open-seated, 220-pound contraption with room for one person, powered by eight battery-powered propellers that howled as loudly as a speedboat.

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If only Weygers could have Seen this X-File!

Alexander Weygers was the father of the UFO flying saucer design and received his US patent in 1944 for what he called the DISCOPTER He competed with Swarovski , Howard Hughes, Honeywell, Heinrich Focke bell and thought he had a better helicopter. A VTOL Disk.

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Welcome to Larry Page’s Secret Flying-Car Factories

Bloomberg Businessweek, June 9, 2016
by Ashlee Vance

Northern California in particular has had a long fascination with flying cars. In 1927 a now mostly forgotten ­engineer named Alexander Weygers first began thinking up the design for a flying saucer that could zip between rooftops. In 1945 he received a patent for what he described as a “­discopter,” a vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) machine with room inside for passengers to walk around, cook, and sleep. He depicted smaller versions landing in pods atop buildings in downtown San Francisco. No discopters were built, though it’s believed that the U.S. Army, which paid visits to Weygers’s compound in Carmel Valley, Calif., tinkered with a prototype.

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Carmel Valley Artist Patented Flying Saucer Five Years Ago

Monterey Peninsula Herald, April 13, 1950
by Ritch Lovejoy

The man who conceived the flying saucer in 1927, completed specifications and drawings, and patented it in 1944, is a talented engineer, artist, engraver, sculptor and teacher named Alexander G. Weygers, 48, who lives with his wife, Marian, in Carmel Valley. The patented name of the flying saucer is Discopter, which may indicate to you how it works, but which does not indicate the subtle improvements over modern flying methods that Weygers theorized so far ahead of his time.

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A Modern Leonardo Who Lives For The Things He Really Wants

San Francisco Chronicle, Mary 8, 1960
by J.T. Root

For the first time in years, Alexander Weygers has had to pay an income tax. This will come as a shock to his neighbors in Carmel Valley where the craggy-faced artist – scientist has been known as the man who escaped one of the two certainties in human existence. While this outwitting of the economic system has been his most intriguing hallmark, he has otheres. In the 14 years he has lived in Carmel, the tall and gangly Weygers has established himself as a latter-day Leonardo, a reluctant, versatile genius whose often-brandished philosophy of “liveing for the things one really wants” piqued so many people that he was persuaded to lecture on it at the Carmel Adult Evening School.

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